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Making Sense of Dylsexia

Making Sense of Dylsexia

Join Lorrie Wolf, owner of Educational Therapy Center, and Michelle Berg Ph.D, the Director of the Center for Learning Disorders, for FREE “Making Sense of Dyslexia”, today, Thursday, Nov. 2nd from 6:30pm to 8pm at Johnson County Community College, Carlson Center #211, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, KS 66221. This is a FREE informational session about how to make sense of a dyslexia diagnosis, the testing, and the data. Both presenters are the original members of the International Dyslexia Association Kansas Missouri...
Learning the Rules for ai and ay

Learning the Rules for ai and ay

Have you ever wondered why we spell train and play differently? They both have the long ā sound. Like you, our parents at the center are eager to learn the same rules taught in the structured literacy program we use to remediate their children. Like you, they want to help their children. Unfortunately, many of us were never taught the rules of our language; we were supposed to learn them by memorization, exposure or intuition. One example from the recent past is a school spelling list a student brought to his tutor that had ai and ay words. She asked him what the rule was for these words. He looked puzzled and said, “The rule is I have to memorize them for the Friday spelling test.” The Orton-Gillingham Approach (O-G) tutor told the student that there is a rule for choosing ai or ay. He is to use “ai” in the beginning or middle of a base word and use “ay” at the end of a base word. Intellectually, this student understood that rule, but he could not apply consistently. The O-G tutor will also require a student to tell why he chose ai or ay for his spelling choice without just saying “it looks right.” Besides the spelling of those 20 words for his spelling test, the tutor also expects him to be able to spell the numerous other words with those two elements. But she will give him practice and review so this student has this rule for a lifetime. Are there exceptions? Always. But for more than 85% of the words, the rule — ai is...
Are Teachers Receiving Adequate Professional Training?

Are Teachers Receiving Adequate Professional Training?

Recently, the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators published a newsletter with an article on page 9 by a trained educator. Her story is also one I have heard often about the lack of adequate professional training—and the author was a special education teacher. Here is an excerpt from the article, How Orton-Gillingham Turned my Career Upside Down, by Mary-Elizabeth Langston, M.A., A/AOGPE. Ms. Langston writes: Here I was, an eager and energetic new educator, filled with current special education knowledge and hard-won experience. I was fresh from graduate school and was in my internship at the county’s most economically disadvantaged elementary school, and no one had ever used the term “dyslexia.” It was not in my vocabulary. I had no actual understanding of what it meant, and I had not met one educator who even referenced dyslexia in the countless IEP and support meetings I had attended…I spent five years as a special education teacher writing IEPs and providing both push-in and pull-out services to elementary students all day long, never truly realizing the specialized instruction my students with dyslexia needed to be successful. I am convinced that, in general, teachers want what is best for their students. Sometimes, these professionals just don’t know what they don’t know. – Lorrie Wolf, Owner & Director of Educational Therapy...
Dyslexia and the Status Quo

Dyslexia and the Status Quo

Parents are always asking me great questions about their students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities. Most recently, a parent asked how her child’s teacher could know nothing about dyslexia. I hear this question all the time as the Director of the Educational Therapy Center. This justifiably frustrated parent reported that her child’s teacher felt that her son, with a documented diagnosis of dyslexia, just needed the right kind of book. Coincidently, I’d just had a conversation with a delightful retired teacher, who told me she had never had a student with dyslexia. And yet, research shows that one in five people is dyslexic. These are examples of well-meaning teachers without the right training and children (20% of the students in these classrooms) not getting the right type of instruction. In Missouri, there is legislation pushing for two hours of training for teachers on the topic of dyslexia. This would be a nice start, but it is only going to give educators the tip of the iceberg on how to bring the dyslexics of the world to their full potential. Anyone else frustrated with the status quo? – Lorrie Wolf, Owner & Director of Educational Therapy...
Dyslexia Dash – Kansas City 2017

Dyslexia Dash – Kansas City 2017

On October 1, 2017 join us at the Dyslexia Dash as we look to “Make America Read Again”. This family friendly 5K walk/run will take place at English Landing Park. Come walk at your leisure and connect with others in the dyslexia community or run for your best time! We will have music, information booths, snacks and fun! Click here to learn more & register: https://register.enter2run.com/Race/MO/Parkville/DyslexiaDashKC   Educational Therapy Center now has a team for the Dyslexia Dash 5k on October 1st! Feel free to join our team or contribute to our team here:...
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